Seattle Photographer Daniel Berman | Seattle editorial photographer | (206) 387-3767 daniel@bermanphotos.com

Amazon.com’s Neil Lindsay for Advertising Age covershoot | Seattle editorial photographer

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I photographed Neil Lindsay, Amazon’s vice president of global advertising and device product-line management, for the cover of Advertising Age and the Power Players list – out this week. It was an incredible honor to be asked to shoot the cover as my first assignment from the advertising and marketing magazine. We had less than an hour with Neil but my team and I were able to capture four different setups across multiple floors and buildings at Amazon’s Bigfoot office in South Lake Union. Art Director Erik Spooner flew in from New York to oversee the shoot and we spent some time that morning scouting through the office and going over the game plan. We settled on three areas and lucked out with a fourth nearby and perfect weather on the roof. I was tethered to a laptop with an external monitor so the team could see each shot — It also let me play a favorite album from Tycho the entire time for relaxing vibes! Big thanks to Erik for the commission, Glynne Davies for hair and makeup, and my assistants Spencer Wallace and Jovelle Abbey Tomayo for hustling and working so hard!

 

Seattle brewery owners for Seattle Weekly Voracious Food Guide

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Ravenna Brewing Owner Tommy Ortega is focused on craft-brewing flavorful specialty beers, like a farm-style saison and a slow-burning jalape–o kolsch. Originally from Hermosa Beach, California, Ortega has quickly created a neighborhood fixture. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

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Georgetown Brewing Company Founder Manny Chao at the Seattle brewery’s headquarters. Chao oversees a brand that produces some of the country’s most popular craft beers, from Manny’s to Lucille IPA.

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Way back in August I had the great pleasure of photographing a section for the Seattle Weekly Voracious Food Guide profiling three different brewery owners known for their hard work and excellent craft beers. I photographed Tommy Ortega at his Ravenna Brewing, Manny Chao at Georgetown Brewing Company and Adam Robbings at Reuben’s Brews (blocks from my house!) It was so cool to step into these guys’ world and hear how they got their start – I had a personal interest as a beer lover and fellow small business owner. Compared to most of my assignments, these were wonderfully slow shoots. Me and the owners and a couple beverages, trying out ideas, hanging out and making pictures.

Robotics Researcher Sergey Levine for MIT Technology Review 35 under 35 | Seattle editorial photographer

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Robots! Labs! Robotic hand labs! Had an awesome shoot back in July that just ran this month in MIT Technology Review. I was commissioned by the art team to photograph and film University of Washington CSE Professor Sergey Levine for #TR35, the magazine’s 35 under 35 feature. Levine has helped pioneer some incredible scientific research on how robotic limbs can be taught to touch and manipulate objects, learning independently through trial and error. I visited the sophisticated lab and was struck by how this robotic hand could be an asset for the future of everything from assembly lines to people requiring fully functioning prosthetic limbs. It was a joy to meet Levine and his co-lead on the ADROIT project, Vikash Kumar. They were gracious with their time and allowed me and my team all the access to do the shoot and get exactly what I envisioned for this story.

 

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos for Welt am Sontag | Seattle editorial photographer

I have only photographed a few people more than once for a portrait so the chance to point my camera toward the CEO of Amazon again for a few minutes made for a pretty surreal morning earlier this month. Jeff Bezos convincingly pretended to remember me as we worked through a few setups and I asked him if Donald Trump ever replied to his tweet offering a rocket ship ride (he hasn’t) and he let out of one of his trademark chuckles. He takes direction well and laughed at my dumb jokes. Perfect subject. Before I knew it, an assistant was calling time and he thanked me and walked out. One of those mornings that are way too early and over way too quickly. Photographed for Welt am Sonntag, a German newspaper http://welt.de  Big thanks to my assistant @jovellephoto too for her help. This is one of my last tear sheets of the year and it was an awesome time.

Gravity Pay CEO Dan Price for Seattle Weekly | Seattle editorial photographer

Back in May I had a cover shoot from Seattle Weekly to photograph Gravity Pay CEO Dan Price at the payment processing company’s headquarters in Ballard. The story was held until now to be included in the Best Of Issue. When I photographed him, Price’s decision to offer a starting salary of $70,000 per year to all of his employees was met by an immediate deluge of international attention. He cut his own multimillion-dollar pay to be able to finance the move. Of course not everyone was happy with the announcement, but the business is seeing an increase in sales and Price says he stands by the principles of making such a transition: for all his employees to have an actual livable wage in the Northwest. Price was humble, present, and generous with his time, and had no problem posing for a few shots with the coffee cup prop we brought in. I gave it to him after the shoot! Assisting by Ian Bates.

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price at their headquarters in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle May 11, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price at their headquarters in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle May 11, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price at their headquarters in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle May 11, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price at their headquarters in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle May 11, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price at their headquarters in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle May 11, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price at their headquarters in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle May 11, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price at their headquarters in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle May 11, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price at their headquarters in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle May 11, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price photographed for Seattle Weekly

Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price photographed for Seattle Weekly

Punk Band The Wimps for Seattle Weekly | Seattle editorial photographer

Punk band The Wimps enjoy a spa day in their usual Seattle surroundings. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly. Styling by Tristan Weholt. L-R: Matt, Rachel, Dave

Seattle Weekly’s art director Jose Trujillo commissioned me for an awesome piece in the paper’s Best Of Issue that would send up the idea of The Wimps, which won Best Punk Band, as this exclusive, uptight group barely making room in their day for the story. As luck would have it, Matt, Rachel and Dave are actually nice people and were game for the idea: Jose wanted to have the band enjoying a spa day somewhere kind of dirty — could it be in an alleyway? I scouted a few hours looking for the right sketchy/usable spot. I checked out parking lots and back streets in Capitol Hill, SoDo, Georgetown, Pioneer Square, the ID and Ballard. With hours to the call time I managed to spot a perfectly questionable, graffiti-covered sidewalk with an absurd amount of garbage strewn about. I did a slow roll. There were boxes of beer upturned, bottles everywhere, and someone had gotten ahold of some chalk. I liked the spot immediately and wondered who would litter like that, then parked the car and waited for the team to assemble. Under some nice intense sunlight and with the help of Seattle stylist Tristan Weholt who sourced and staged everything else (and made a plate of guitar-shaped tea sandwiches and refreshing fruit-infused water to boot), plus the help of good friend Matt McKnight assisting, we got to work transforming this SoDo backlot into our makeshift alley spa.

Punk band The Wimps enjoy a spa day in their usual Seattle surroundings. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly. Styling by Tristan Weholt. L-R: Matt, Rachel, Dave

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Google Economic Impact Report | Seattle editorial photographer

Back in March I got a surprising phone call. It was about 6 in the evening on a Monday and a producer at North6 was searching for a photographer to shoot for a Google project. Where? A remote Alaskan town. When? That weekend. I half expected a radio DJ to burst out laughing on the other end. But the assignment was to photograph an aerial tour guide in Talkeetna, a few hours north of Anchorage, as part of Google’s state-by-state Economic Impact Report highlighting how small businesses use Google services. I hoped for a chance to fly around Denali, but alas, that shoot became impossible due to scheduling. But I stayed in touch with the client and fortunately there were opportunities to take on assignments for the project in far more familiar places.

I photographed Portland Meat Collective Founder Camas Davis in Oregon, then Sip & Ship Owner Diana Naramore in Seattle, and flew to Boise, Idaho, to photograph Tsheets.com Founder Matt Rissell on a quick there-and-back trip April 1st.

Portland Meat Collective Owner Camas Davis teaches a class about preparing and cooking pork at Elder Hall in Portland Wednesday Mar. 18, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Portland Meat Collective Owner Camas Davis teaches a class about preparing and cooking pork at Elder Hall in Portland Wednesday Mar. 18, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Portland Meat Collective Owner Camas Davis teaches a class about preparing and cooking pork at Elder Hall in Portland Wednesday Mar. 18, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Portland Meat Collective Owner Camas Davis teaches a class about preparing and cooking pork at Elder Hall in Portland Wednesday Mar. 18, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Portland Meat Collective Owner Camas Davis teaches a class about preparing and cooking pork at Elder Hall in Portland Wednesday Mar. 18, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Portland Meat Collective Owner Camas Davis teaches a class about preparing and cooking pork at Elder Hall in Portland Wednesday Mar. 18, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Portland Meat Collective Owner Camas Davis teaches a class about preparing and cooking pork at Elder Hall in Portland Wednesday Mar. 18, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google

Portland Meat Collective Owner Camas Davis teaches a class about preparing and cooking pork at Elder Hall in Portland Wednesday Mar. 18, 2015. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google

Sip & Ship Owner Diana Naramore at her Ballard location in Seattle Tuesday March 23, 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Sip & Ship Owner Diana Naramore at her Ballard location in Seattle Tuesday March 23, 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Sip & Ship Owner Diana Naramore at her Ballard location in Seattle Tuesday March 23, 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Sip & Ship Owner Diana Naramore at her Ballard location in Seattle Tuesday March 23, 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Sip & Ship Owner Diana Naramore at her Ballard location in Seattle Tuesday March 23, 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Sip & Ship Owner Diana Naramore at her Ballard location in Seattle Tuesday March 23, 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Sip & Ship Owner Diana Naramore at her Ballard location in Seattle Tuesday March 23, 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Sip & Ship Owner Diana Naramore at her Ballard location in Seattle Tuesday March 23, 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Tsheets.com CEO Matt Rissell poses for a portrait at their office April 1, 2015 in Eagle, ID. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Tsheets.com CEO Matt Rissell poses for a portrait at their office April 1, 2015 in Eagle, ID. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Tsheets.com CEO Matt Rissell poses for a portrait at their office April 1, 2015 in Eagle, ID. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Tsheets.com CEO Matt Rissell poses for a portrait at their office April 1, 2015 in Eagle, ID. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Tsheets.com CEO Matt Rissell poses for a portrait at their office April 1, 2015 in Eagle, ID. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Tsheets.com CEO Matt Rissell poses for a portrait at their office April 1, 2015 in Eagle, ID. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Tsheets.com CEO Matt Rissell poses for a portrait at their office April 1, 2015 in Eagle, ID. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Tsheets.com CEO Matt Rissell poses for a portrait at their office April 1, 2015 in Eagle, ID. Photo by Daniel Berman for Google.

Restoring John Steinbeck’s Western Flyer | for Seattle Weekly cover

Backed into the southwest corner of a large, unassuming dry dock in Port Townsend, Washington is a vessel with plenty of history. Maybe you’ve heard of John Steinbeck’s book The Sea of Cortez? This is the boat that took him and his team on their epic, problem-laden-but-ultimately-successful tour of the Gulf of California, then in its prime 75 years ago.

Today, the boat has new ownership under John Gregg, a geologist who spent $1 mil to call it his, and will likely have to spend a similar amount to fully restore it. Still, he’s dedicated to getting the boat ship-shape. Other people have tried before yet failed to do so, starting and stopping the restoration process for one reason or another – often financial, sometimes personal. There’s much more to this story, well-told in a fascinating piece by Patrick Hutchison.

The owner was unavailable for a portrait, but his manager for the project is Mike York, a longtime Seattleite who spends most of the week working slowly but surely to coordinate getting this boat back to order. I got the call last Friday from Seattle Weekly to head up to meet Mike the next day. Port Townsend is a ferry ride and an hour and a half of driving, but I’m not complaining. It was nice to check out of town for the morning and cruise through the countryside. Eventually I arrived at the dry dock. I knew what the boat looked like from Google but it wasn’t jumping out at me. I asked around. Did anyone know the John Steinbeck boat? A few workers threw back sympathetic but unhelpful stares. I had one more area to check out and there it was, nestled between cargo containers, a forklift and a set of hand built wooden stairs reaching to deck height.

This, was the Western Flyer.

Curious area residents and tourists from around the country arrive each day to take a peek at the Western Flyer. The adventures onboard close to 75 years ago were foddor for Steinbeck’s prized non-fiction book, “The Log from Sea of Cortez.” Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

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A view of the Western Flyer ship once owned by  the author John Steinbeck, and now by John Gregg. After many failed attempts, the craft is being restored by a team at a dry dock in Port Townsend, Washington. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

A view of the Western Flyer ship once owned by the author John Steinbeck, and now by John Gregg. After many failed attempts, the craft is being restored by a team at a dry dock in Port Townsend, Washington. Photo by Daniel Berman for Seattle Weekly.

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Western Flyer

Afterward, Mike asked if I wanted to climb aboard for a peek inside. That just required scaling the stairs and then a narrow ladder. With my c-stand and studio light. Oh well. Every day is arm day when you’re a lighting photographer I guess. It was worth it anyway to see what is best described as a Titanic-esque scene. Just wall-to-wall barnacles capped off by grime and rust-covered artifacts from previous owners and occupants.

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Onboard and inside the Western Flyer.

The cabin has seen better days.

The cabin has seen better days.

 

Space was at a premium. I hunched into the corner with my wide angle to try and show what sinking and years of decay will do to a place. The wall left a fine coat of white dust down my back. Cest la vie. Normally I am assigned to photograph people or preparing meticulous staged product photography, and I enjoy this work, yet getting the chance to document something in disrepair, so completely varnished, just lost in a time capsule, made for one of the most fascinating shoots yet of 2015.

 

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The Western Flyer attracts plenty of onlookers curious about the ship’s fate.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon for Seattle Weekly | Seattle editorial photographer

I had a great assignment from Seattle Weekly earlier this month to photograph Cary Moon, an activist and urban designer who opposes continued development of the Bertha tunnel project. For those not living in Seattle, the waterfront highway a.k.a the Highway 99 Viaduct, is being torn down and replaced with a tunnel. The project has been plagued with problems and delays, some technical, some bureaucratic — all expensive. Check out the story for a much more thorough peek into why this divisive issue matters so much. We battled the wind on top of Pier 86 in downtown for a view of the skyline and then moved to under the viaduct for another view of the city.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

Bertha tunnel project activist Cary Moon. Photographed for Seattle Weekly.

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Thanks for looking,

Daniel

Harry Partch instruments for KUOW | Seattle editorial photographer

It’s not every day that you get to see and hear a piece of history. Make that pieces. I got an assignment last week from KUOW to photograph Charles Corey, the 30-year-old caretaker of the Harry Partch instruments collection at the University of Washington School of Music. In a fun story by Marcie Sillman you can actually hear the renowned, intricate instruments. Partch created the instruments between the 1940s and 1970s, and they are based on the Just Intonation scale, not anything like what we are used to hearing from traditional instruments. You can find some really intense theatrical productions of Partch’s arrangements on Youtube too that help put his life’s work in context. He wasn’t just a composer and musician, he was also a playwright and auteur.

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. Corey demonstrates the Adapted Viola. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. Corey demonstrates the Adapted Viola. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. Corey demonstrates the Chromelodeon, created in 1941. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. Corey demonstrates the Chromelodeon, created in 1941. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. A view of the Cloud Chamber Bowls, created in 1950. The bowls are the sawed-off bottoms of large glass bottles made by Pyrex, and produce different tons when tapped on the top or bottom or scraped along the side. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. A view of the Cloud Chamber Bowls, created in 1950. The bowls are the sawed-off bottoms of large glass bottles made by Pyrex, and produce different tons when tapped on the top or bottom or scraped along the side. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. Corey demonstrates Bass Marimba, which requires standing on a large bench to reach playing height. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. Corey demonstrates Bass Marimba, which requires standing on a large bench to reach playing height. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. Corey demonstrates the Kithara II, created in 1954 by Partch. Glass tubes are moved up and down on the sides to create varying pressure and different tonality. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. Corey demonstrates the Kithara II, created in 1954 by Partch. Glass tubes are moved up and down on the sides to create varying pressure and different tonality. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. "I've been doing this almost 13 years now," Corey said. The instruments were created between the 1940s and 1960s by the American composer Partch. The instruments are renowned for their complex and unique sound structure abilities based on the Just Intonation scale, which was designed to more naturally imitate human voice pitch. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

Chuck Corey, 30, is a faculty research associate in the University of Washington School of Music where he curates the Harry Partch instruments collection. “I’ve been doing this almost 13 years now,” Corey said. The instruments were created between the 1940s and 1960s by the American composer Partch. The instruments are renowned for their complex and unique sound structure abilities based on the Just Intonation scale, which was designed to more naturally imitate human voice pitch. Photo by Daniel Berman for KUOW

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