Seattle Photographer Daniel Berman | Bellingham, WA | (206) 387-3767 daniel@bermanphotos.com

The Year in Pot – Marijuana legalization photos in Washington state | Seattle editorial photographer

Washington’s legalization of marijuana under Initiative 502 has dominated my assignment requests this year.
I am so grateful for wonderful clients like Northwest Leaf, The Daily Telegraph of London, Barcroft Media, The UK Sun, and Seattle Weekly, that have commissioned or licensed marijuana work this year! A whole lot of dramatic changes are still to come, like the new recreational pot stores opening, new big businesses popping up, and the impact of all this on the community and the alike. Washington, alongside Colorado, are going to be the battlegrounds for a radical paradigm shift, and I hope to have an opportunity to document it as much as I did this incredible year.

A marijuana strain called Mexican Sunrise is seen at a medical marijuana patient's home in Snohomish County, Wash February 7, 2013. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

A marijuana strain called Mexican Sunrise is seen at a medical marijuana patient’s home in Snohomish County, Wash February 7, 2013. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Ryan Barker of Modus Vivendi works to weigh out some Maui Wowi strain marijuana for a patient during the grand opening of the Rainier Beach location of the NW Cannabis Market Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013 in Seattle. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Ryan Barker of Modus Vivendi works to weigh out some Maui Wowi strain marijuana for a patient during the grand opening of the Rainier Beach location of the NW Cannabis Market Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013 in Seattle. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

A worker at a Spokane, Wash. medical marijuana access point February 15, 2013. Ten access points have sprouted up across downtown Spokane in the past year after Drug Enforcement Administration officials shuttered more than three dozen collectives a few years ago — citing proximity to schools and parks. Today, the collectives share a friendly but competitive spirit, and patients can avoid the dire alternative: returning to the unsafe streets to acquire their medicine on the black market. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

A worker at a Spokane, Wash. medical marijuana access point February 15, 2013. Ten access points have sprouted up across downtown Spokane in the past year after Drug Enforcement Administration officials shuttered more than three dozen collectives a few years ago — citing proximity to schools and parks. Today, the collectives share a friendly but competitive spirit, and patients can avoid the dire alternative: returning to the unsafe streets to acquire their medicine on the black market. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Northwest Patient Resource Center co-owner Jake Dimmock walks through one of the on-site marijuana gardens which provide medicine for their patients, May 9, 2013. NWPRC hopes to be one of the brand name dispensaries to enter the recreational market, and they have purchased multiple locations suitable under the new laws. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Northwest Patient Resource Center co-owner Jake Dimmock walks through one of the on-site marijuana gardens which provide medicine for their patients, May 9, 2013. NWPRC hopes to be one of the brand name dispensaries to enter the recreational market, and they have purchased multiple locations suitable under the new laws. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Ladarius Freeman, 23, from Atlanta, does a French inhale  while smoking a marijuana blunt during the Cannabis Freedom March Saturday May 11, 2013 in Seattle. "I like it here, it's so out in the open — I can be myself," Freeman said. "And the weed is good and cheap, I'm used to $20 a gram." Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Ladarius Freeman, 23, from Atlanta, does a French inhale while smoking a marijuana blunt during the Cannabis Freedom March Saturday May 11, 2013 in Seattle. “I like it here, it’s so out in the open — I can be myself,” Freeman said. “And the weed is good and cheap, I’m used to $20 a gram.” Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox showed his support for Diego Pellicer CEO Jamen Shively, center, at a news conference announcing the company's plans for dozens of branded legal marijuana stores across Washington state and Colorado Thursday May 30, 2013 in Seattle. Said Shively, "Our group will be investing in the hundreds of millions of dollars in this industry." Diego Pellicer, Inc. has acquired local dispensary Northwest Patient Resource Center, co-founder John Davis said at the conference. Shively stated the company would become the world leader in adult-use and medical marijuana. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox showed his support for Diego Pellicer CEO Jamen Shively, center, at a news conference announcing the company’s plans for dozens of branded legal marijuana stores across Washington state and Colorado Thursday May 30, 2013 in Seattle. Said Shively, “Our group will be investing in the hundreds of millions of dollars in this industry.” Diego Pellicer, Inc. has acquired local dispensary Northwest Patient Resource Center, co-founder John Davis said at the conference. Shively stated the company would become the world leader in adult-use and medical marijuana. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

A medical marijuana patient offers up a hit of a joint at a marijuana farmers market called MMJ Universe in Black Diamond, Wash., a little less than an hour southeast of Seattle, June 2, 2013. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

A medical marijuana patient offers up a hit of a joint at a marijuana farmers market called MMJ Universe in Black Diamond, Wash., a little less than an hour southeast of Seattle, June 2, 2013. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

State troopers stand guard as marijuana users and medical marijuana patients protest at the Washington state capitol June 19, 2013 against proposed changes to the medical laws under Initiative 502 that they say would harm their access and ability to use the medicine that works for them. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

State troopers stand guard as marijuana users and medical marijuana patients protest at the Washington state capitol June 19, 2013 against proposed changes to the medical laws under Initiative 502 that they say would harm their access and ability to use the medicine that works for them. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

One of three 36-foot-long marijuana grow tents maintained by Joe Parker of Port Angeles, Wash, on the state's Northwest peninsula August 2, 2013. He grows the marijuana for medical patients currently and said he wants to focus on their needs first. Parker said the area's wetness and humidity help his plants grow strong and developed. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

One of three 36-foot-long marijuana grow tents maintained by Joe Parker of Port Angeles, Wash, on the state’s Northwest peninsula August 2, 2013. He grows the marijuana for medical patients currently and said he wants to focus on their needs first. Parker said the area’s wetness and humidity help his plants grow strong and developed. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Joe Parker inspects marijuana hanging to dry in his home garage in Port Angeles, Wash, on the state's Northwest peninsula August 2, 2013. He grows the marijuana for medical patients currently and said he wants to focus on their needs first. Parker said the area's wetness and humidity help his plants grow strong and developed. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Joe Parker inspects marijuana hanging to dry in his home garage in Port Angeles, Wash, on the state’s Northwest peninsula August 2, 2013. He grows the marijuana for medical patients currently and said he wants to focus on their needs first. Parker said the area’s wetness and humidity help his plants grow strong and developed. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Yanni, Kevin, Mike, Montana and Jeremy Moberg work to trim marijuana ready for harvesting at a site owned by grower Moberg in Okanogan County, Wash. not far from the Canadian border, Sept. 18, 2013. Temperatures often rise to 90 degrees in the sunny domain of Eastern Washington. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Yanni, Kevin, Mike, Montana and Jeremy Moberg work to trim marijuana ready for harvesting at a site owned by grower Moberg in Okanogan County, Wash. not far from the Canadian border, Sept. 18, 2013. Temperatures often rise to 90 degrees in the sunny domain of Eastern Washington. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

“It’s heaven to wake up out here,” said Keif Shrefler, 30, a marijuana grower in Vancouver, Wash. who lives in a tent under the same canopy as the plants he tends at the home of grower Tom Lauerman. A former law student, Shrefler said smoking each morning “first thing,” leaves him with a clear energy that inspires getting right back to work alongside a handful of other dedicated volunteers on the 5-acre farm. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

“It’s heaven to wake up out here,” said Keif Shrefler, 30, a marijuana grower in Vancouver, Wash. who lives in a tent under the same canopy as the plants he tends at the home of grower Tom Lauerman. A former law student, Shrefler said smoking each morning “first thing,” leaves him with a clear energy that inspires getting right back to work alongside a handful of other dedicated volunteers on the 5-acre farm. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Edward Barnes of Keep Calm And Medicate Shirts, arrived in town just one day prior to the start of Seattle Hempfest, after moving from Detroit. "These three days are going to be a marathon," Barnes said, noting he has vended the shirt line at the two-day Denver and San Francisco Cannabis Cups previously. Photo by Daniel Berman/bermanphotos.com

Edward Barnes of Keep Calm And Medicate Shirts, arrived in town just one day prior to the start of Seattle Hempfest, after moving from Detroit. “These three days are going to be a marathon,” Barnes said, noting he has vended the shirt line at the two-day Denver and San Francisco Cannabis Cups previously. Photo by Daniel Berman/bermanphotos.com

 

Seattle Police Department Spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb helps hand out bags of Doritos along with information on marijuana legalization measure Initiative 502 to attendees on day two of Seattle Hempfest Saturday August 17, 2013 in Myrtle Edwards Park. The recreational use of marijuana for those over 21 was legalized by Initiative 502 in December 2012. Public consumption of marijuana remains illegal under I-502. Seattle Hempfest is hailed as the world's largest marijuana "protestival" and organizers expect to attract more than 300,000 visitors to the park during the three-day weekend. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Seattle Police Department Spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb helps hand out bags of Doritos along with information on marijuana legalization measure Initiative 502 to attendees on day two of Seattle Hempfest Saturday August 17, 2013 in Myrtle Edwards Park. The recreational use of marijuana for those over 21 was legalized by Initiative 502 in December 2012. Public consumption of marijuana remains illegal under I-502. Seattle Hempfest is hailed as the world’s largest marijuana “protestival” and organizers expect to attract more than 300,000 visitors to the park during the three-day weekend. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

"They're setting back years of traction in proving marijuana has medicinal uses by designating it as an intoxicants," said Michael Dare, a patient of five years, during a protest at Seattle City Hall before a public comment hearing Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 by the Washington State Liquor Control Board, which will take over regulating medical marijuana in the state. "I'm concerned that the marijuana that only really helps those in pain, the stuff high in CBD, will not be available," Dare said of the state's plans for new legal, recreational marijuana stores. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

“They’re setting back years of traction in proving marijuana has medicinal uses by designating it as an intoxicants,” said Michael Dare, a patient of five years, during a protest at Seattle City Hall before a public comment hearing Tuesday Oct. 8, 2013 by the Washington State Liquor Control Board, which will take over regulating medical marijuana in the state. “I’m concerned that the marijuana that only really helps those in pain, the stuff high in CBD, will not be available,” Dare said of the state’s plans for new legal, recreational marijuana stores. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Attendees at the $650-per-ticket 2nd Annual National Marijuana Conference and Expo Wednesday Nov. 6, 2013 at Emerald Downs in Auburn. The three-day event attracted marijuana investors and business entrepreneurs from across the country to a area horse track hosting the conference. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Attendees at the $650-per-ticket 2nd Annual National Marijuana Conference and Expo Wednesday Nov. 6, 2013 at Emerald Downs in Auburn. The three-day event attracted marijuana investors and business entrepreneurs from across the country to a area horse track hosting the conference. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Washington state Liquor Control Board member Chris Marr indicates that time is running out for a patient's testimony during a hearing for public comment on proposed changes to medical marijuana law under Initiative 502, Wednesday Nov. 13, 2013 at Saint Martin's University in Lacey, Wash. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Washington state Liquor Control Board member Chris Marr indicates that time is running out for a patient’s testimony during a hearing for public comment on proposed changes to medical marijuana law under Initiative 502, Wednesday Nov. 13, 2013 at Saint Martin’s University in Lacey, Wash. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

DanielBerman_WashingtonSeattlemarijuanaphotos_legalization_0019

A large communal joint was passed around during a Legalization Day celebration marking the first anniversary of marijuana legalization under Initiative 502 at Seattle Center Friday Dec. 6, 2013. Adults over the age of 21 may now possess up to an ounce of marijuana, and stores to purchase the recreational pot are expected to open Spring 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Chris Padron,22, of Seattle, smokes from his pipe during a Legalization Day celebration marking the first anniversary of marijuana legalization under Initiative 502 at Seattle Center Friday Dec. 6, 2013. Adults over the age of 21 may now possess up to an ounce of marijuana, and stores to purchase the recreational pot are expected to open Spring 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Chris Padron,22, of Seattle, smokes from his pipe during a Legalization Day celebration marking the first anniversary of marijuana legalization under Initiative 502 at Seattle Center Friday Dec. 6, 2013. Adults over the age of 21 may now possess up to an ounce of marijuana, and stores to purchase the recreational pot are expected to open Spring 2014. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Thanks to all my friends and colleagues for their continuing support of my work on this story.

Onward and upward in 2014!

Daniel

Bezos Center for Innovation Launch for Puget Sound Business Journal | Seattle editorial photographer

I had a fun assignment Saturday for the Puget Sound Business Journal to photograph the launch of the Bezos Center for Innovation Friday Oct. 11 at the Museum of History and Industry in the South Lake Union neighborhood of Seattle! I wandered around and grabbed some features before the start of the on-stage interview. MOHAI has been completely revamped in its new location there, and the dedication to detail is impressive. The new exhibits that comprise the Center are fun and interactive — I only wish I could have had more time to really dig through some of them. Maybe next time…

A screen of lights and digital displays frame Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos as he speaks with MOHAI Executive Director Leonard Garfield during the launch of the Bezos Center for Innovation at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) in South Lake Union Friday Oct. 11, 2013. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

A screen of lights and digital displays frame Amazon.com Founder and CEO Jeff Bezos as he speaks with MOHAI Executive Director Leonard Garfield during the launch of the Bezos Center for Innovation at the Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) in South Lake Union Friday Oct. 11, 2013. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

(more…)

Jamen Shively for Seattle Weekly | Seattle editorial photographer

Jamen Shively for Seattle Weekly | Seattle editorial photographer

I am happy to see my work in a publication that I grew up with for so long! 

Seattle Weekly reached out to me about some of my archive images of Jamen Shively, who I covered at a May 30th press conference in the swanky Columbia Tower.

Shively told the gathered media from around the world that he and his partners planned to open up Diego Pellicer, the first global legal marijuana brand, as former Mexican President Vicente Fox, who said he agreed with the need for drug policy changes, stood stoically at his side.

Shively made aggressive, promising statements about the company’s future, as he diplomatically obfuscated from media questions surrounding everything from how the company would grow the pot to distribute it to raise the capital to have this massive infrastructure.
Today, Shively is out as the face of Pellicer, in a very fascinating cover story from Seattle Weekly’s Nina Shapiro — one of my favorites. Thanks for looking!

Jamen Shively, a former Microsoft executive, announces plans for the world's largest legal marijuana company, Diego Pellicer, named for his 19th century hemp growing great grandfather, at a press conference at Columbia Tower in Seattle May 30, 2013. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Jamen Shively, a former Microsoft executive, announces plans for the world’s largest legal marijuana company, Diego Pellicer, named for his 19th century hemp growing great grandfather, at a press conference at Columbia Tower in Seattle May 30, 2013. Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

 

Rebecca Howlett for University of Kansas School of Law

Rebecca Howlett for University of Kansas School of Law, Kanji & Katzen intern

I had an assignment in August to photograph Rebecca Howlett, a tribal law intern at the firm Kanji & Katzen, for a recruiting guide published by the University of Kansas School of Law. The piece highlights the great work that KU students do as interns at firms across the country. It just came out and looks great! I was requested to photograph her with a nice Seattle-identifying backdrop, which was easy with the firms’s Pioneer Square offices overlooking Smith Tower (the pencil building). To combat the intense overhead sunlight, I had my assistant, David Ryder, hold a reflector scrim over Rebecca to put her in the shade. Then I brought in a beauty dish for the main light and a softbox for a bit of fill, to give the image a fun, dynamic look. The client was happy with the take and Rebecca told me I was easy to work with — that’s nice of her since it was about 90 degrees on the roof that day! What a trooper!

Thanks for looking,

Daniel

Shoreline Community College Professor Troy Wolff slain

Posted in Seattle editorial photographer by bermanphotos on September 14, 2013

R.I.P Troy Wolff, my old English professor at Shoreline Community College, who was murdered Sept. 13, 2013 by a deranged man outside of the Seattle Sounders game. The man began randomly attacking and stabbing his girlfriend, Kristen Ito. Wolff intervened and the man began stabbing him — he later died from his injuries. Ito remains in critical condition.
This news is just senseless and absolutely shocking. Troy was a really caring professor. I remember him telling me that an essay I submitted could have been better, and he wouldn’t accept it without revision. Even at a community college when I was one of a hundred students he saw that day, he cared enough to really help. I had photographed him for the school newspaper back in 2009 when I was a young pup. Troy was beloved at Shoreline CC, where he taught for 17 years and was chair of the English department.
He will be missed.

Tagged with:

Mykayla Comstock for The Sun | Seattle editorial photographer

Homemade capsules containing a Cannabis oil extract have successfully helped Mykayla Comstock, 7, of Pendleton, OR. USA treat her acute t-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. With her blood cell counts returned to normal, Comstock is not hospitalized like many ca

I got a call last Saturday from the The Sun, a British newspaper, to photograph portraits of Mykayla Comstock and her family out in Pendleton, OR. The client needed the pictures shot Sunday and turned around on a very short deadline by Sunday night, and I had to make the five-hour drive to get there. So I packed up my Escape with my backdrops and portable studio lighting and hit the road. Although I live in Seattle, the paper thought I would be a good choice given my experience in photographing marijuana related stories and subjects.

Homemade capsules containing a Cannabis oil extract have successfully helped Mykayla Comstock, 7, of Pendleton, OR. USA treat her acute t-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. With her blood cell counts returned to normal, Comstock is not hospitalized like many ca

Homemade capsules containing a Cannabis oil extract have successfully helped Mykayla Comstock, 7, of Pendleton, OR. USA treat her acute t-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. With her blood cell counts returned to normal, Comstock is not hospitalized like many ca Homemade capsules containing a Cannabis oil extract have successfully helped Mykayla Comstock, 7, of Pendleton, OR. USA treat her acute t-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. With her blood cell counts returned to normal, Comstock is not hospitalized like many caI was grateful to be able to tell the story of such an inspiring little girl. Twice a day, Mykayla, 8, receives homemade capsules containing a Cannabis oil extract prepared by her mother, Erin Purchase, 25, and her partner, Brandon Krenzler. As a result, the blood cell counts devastated by acute t-cell lymphoblastic leukemia have returned to normal levels — and Mykayla is happily growing stronger and healthier every day. And she isn’t languishing in a hospital. After a year of the Cannabis treatments, Mykayla’s cancer has not returned, and she will be considered in remission in another year. The family received tremendous national scrutiny after their story was first written about in The Oregonian. The debate over whether parents should give their children Cannabis remains fiery, but for this family, nothing else has worked as well.  (more…)

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes for the Omaha-World Herald | Seattle editorial photographer

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization's global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world. He posed for a portrait Thursday May 30 at the foundation's headquarters in downtown Seattle, Wash.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization’s global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world. He posed for a portrait Thursday May 30 at the foundation’s headquarters in downtown Seattle, Wash.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization's global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world. He posed for a portrait Thursday May 30 at the foundation's headquarters in downtown Seattle, Wash.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization’s global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world. He posed for a portrait Thursday May 30 at the foundation’s headquarters in downtown Seattle, Wash.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization's global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world. He posed for a portrait Thursday May 30 at the foundation's headquarters in downtown Seattle, Wash.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization’s global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world. He posed for a portrait Thursday May 30 at the foundation’s headquarters in downtown Seattle, Wash.

Charlotte Ball, senior manager of the visitors center at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation world headquarters in Seattle, walks past the north building reflecting the Space Needle Thursday May 30. CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization's global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world.

Charlotte Ball, senior manager of the visitors center at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation world headquarters in Seattle, walks past the north building reflecting the Space Needle Thursday May 30. CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization’s global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation world headquarters, bottom-left, opened in 2011 and anchors the lower South Lake Union and Queen Anne neighborhoods of Seattle. It is visible from the observation deck of the nearby Space Needle. Rainwater is filtered through the green roof of the adjacent parking garage and repurposed for irrigation, water features and gray water uses.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation world headquarters, bottom-left, opened in 2011 and anchors the lower South Lake Union and Queen Anne neighborhoods of Seattle. It is visible from the observation deck of the nearby Space Needle. Rainwater is filtered through the green roof of the adjacent parking garage and repurposed for irrigation, water features and gray water uses.

I photographed Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes for the Omaha World-Herald last month, for a story on the organization’s efforts worldwide to eradicate diseases and improve childhood education. Raikes, originally from Nebraska, still is connected to the area through billionaire Warren Buffett. The so-called Oracla of Omaha recently donated $2 billion to the foundation, and has agreed to donate the majority of his worth to the foundation over the next 50 years. I was asked to make portraits that showed Raikes’ personality and make architectural images of the foundation’s downtown Seattle offices. It would be a plus if I could also get shots of any memorabilia in his office that showed off his University of Nebraska roots. This was a challenging assignment since the editor and reporter were unsure if I would have any one-on-one time with Jeff.

I am used to working quickly and efficiently for portraits so I indicated that if I could just get five minutes for a portrait, that would be sufficient. His staff agreed and my assistant and I hurriedly set up on the top floor of the gorgeous building overlooking the city. I walked through a quick game plan after having zero time to scout the building beforehand due to security: I decided I would shoot something close up at a short distance, then move for a telephoto image going down the hall, then jog to the other side of the boomerang-shaped building and photograph Jeff looking through the glass. This provided my editor multiple options in just a few minutes.

Raikes was easy to work with and even poked fun at me when I asked him to turn this way or that. My assistant kept track of the time, calling out three minutes, and one minute, so we knew we weren’t going over into the time meant for the interview. Satisfied with the portraits, I asked to photograph the first couple minutes of the interview, and his staff agreed. I was able to make interesting detail shots and I liked how relaxed he appeared sitting in his office.

Walking out of the building to my car, I looked up and the Space Needle caught my eye. I thought I could probably get a cool overall of the building from the observation deck, and show how the Foundation anchors the Queen Anne/South Lake Union neighborhood. $19 later and I was up nearly 600 feet in the air, and as the stormy wind whipped around, I held my camera up above my head to see past the guard wires. It worked out great, and was an interesting way to finish off a thrilling assignment. The story received great play in print and can be seen below.


Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization's global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world. He posed for a portrait Thursday May 30 at the foundation's headquarters in downtown Seattle, Wash.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes has helped lead the organization’s global initiatives to end preventable diseases and expand education and technological outreach around the world. He posed for a portrait Thursday May 30 at the foundation’s headquarters in downtown Seattle, Wash.

Photos of Jeff Raikes are available for license in my archive

Thanks for looking!

Daniel

Leah Sauser | Seattle editorial photographer

Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

Photo by Daniel Berman/www.bermanphotos.com

I had a great time working with Leah this week. She asked me to make some new professional images of her for use on social media sites that showcased her energy for her field. We shot at her office in Seattle working the natural light — that’s right, often the best light is the one already there.

Please give me a call or email if you or your organization want professional and updated headshot and portrait photography in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest.

Thanks for looking,

Daniel

Rally to save medical cannabis | Seattle editorial photographer

Posted in assignment work by bermanphotos on June 20, 2013

Rally to save medical cannabis | Seattle editorial photographer

About 150 medical Cannabis patients and supporters crowded the sundial at the Washington state capitol in Olympia Wednesday June 19. Their message was simple: patients should not be taxed on their medicine, and the Washington state Liquor Control Board has no business regulating medicine. Voters this year passed Initiative 502 legalizing, taxing and regulating the recreational use of marijuana by those over 21. The board was tasked with creating the regulatory framework for a legal marijuana market from seed to store. Some patients worry the board’s financial interest in taxing recreational marijuana will mean the end of storefront access to medicinal marijuana, which is not currently taxed.

Rally to save medical cannabis | Seattle editorial photographer

Posted in assignment work by bermanphotos on June 20, 2013

Rally to save medical cannabis | Seattle editorial photographer

About 150 medical Cannabis patients and supporters crowded the sundial at the Washington state capitol in Olympia Wednesday June 19. Their message was simple: patients should not be taxed on their medicine, and the Washington state Liquor Control Board has no business regulating medicine. Voters this year passed Initiative 502 legalizing, taxing and regulating the recreational use of marijuana by those over 21. The board was tasked with creating the regulatory framework for a legal marijuana market from seed to store. Some patients worry the board’s financial interest in taxing recreational marijuana will mean the end of storefront access to medicinal marijuana, which is not currently taxed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: